Blogging with semantic insertions and deletions

When I write a blog post, it generally becomes a static thing: its content always usually stays the same for the rest of its life (which is, in my case, pretty much forever). But sometimes, I go back and make an amendment. When I make minor changes that don’t affect the overall meaning of the work, like fixing spelling mistakes and repointing broken links, I just edit the page, but for more-significant changes I try to make it clear what’s changed and how.

An insertion and a deletion on a 2007 blog post announcing Troma Night plans.
This blog post from 2007, for example, was amended after its publication with the insertion of content at the top and the deletion of content within.

Historically, I’d usually marked up deletions with the HTML <strike>/<s> elements (or other visually-similar approaches) and insertions by clearly stating that a change had been made (usually accompanied by the date and/or time of the change), but this isn’t a good example of semantic code. It also introduces an ambiguity when it clashes with the times I use <s> for comedic effect in the Web equivalent of the old caret-notation joke:

Be nice to this fool^H^H^H^Hgentleman, he's visiting from corporate HQ.

Better, then, to use the <ins> and <del> elements, which were designed for exactly this purpose and even accept attributes to specify the date/time of the modification and to cite a resource that explains the change, e.g. <ins datetime="2019-05-03T09:00:00+00:00" cite="https://alices-blog.example.com/2019/05/03/speaking.html">The last speaker slot has now been filled; thanks Alice</ins>. I’ve worked to retroactively add such semantic markup to my historical posts where possible, but it’ll be an easier task going forwards.

Of course, no browser I’m aware of supports these attributes, which is a pity because the metadata they hold may well have value to a reader. In order to expose them I’ve added a little bit of CSS that looks a little like this, which makes their details (where available) visible as a sort-of tooltip when hovering over or tapping on an affected area. Give it a go with the edits at the top of this post!

ins[datetime], del[datetime] {
  position: relative;
}

ins[datetime]::before, del[datetime]::before {
  position: absolute;
  top: -24px;
  font-size: 12px;
  color: #fff;
  border-radius: 4px;
  padding: 2px 6px;
  opacity: 0;
  transition: opacity 0.25s;
  hyphens: none;                    /* suppresses sitewide line break hyphenation rules */
  white-space: nowrap;              /* suppresses extraneous line breaks in Chrome      */
}

ins[datetime]:hover::before, del[datetime]:hover::before {
  opacity: 0.75;
}

ins[datetime]::before {
  content: 'inserted ' attr(datetime) ' ' attr(cite);
  background: #050;                 /* insertions are white-on-green                    */
}

del[datetime]::before {
  content: 'deleted ' attr(datetime) ' ' attr(cite);
  background: #500;                 /* deletions are white-on-red                       */
}
CSS facilitating the display of <ins>/<del> datetimes and citations on hover or touch.

I’m aware that the intended use-case of <ins>/<del> is change management, and that the expectation is that the “final” version of a document wouldn’t be expected to show all of the changes that had been made to it. Such a thing could be simulated, I suppose, by appropriately hiding and styling the <ins>/<del> blocks on the client-side, and that’s something I might look into in future, but in practice my edits are typically small and rare enough that nobody would feel inconvenienced by their inclusion/highlighting: after all, nobody’s complained so far and I’ve been doing exactly that, albeit in a non-semantic way, for many years!

I’m also slightly conscious that my approach to the “tooltip” might cause it to obstruct interactivity with something directly above an insertion or deletion: e.g. making a hyperlink inaccessible. I’ve tested with a variety of browsers and devices and it doesn’t seem to happen (my line height works in my favour) but it’s something I’ll need to be mindful of if I change my typographic design significantly in the future.

A final observation: I love the CSS attr() function, and I’ve been using it (and counter()) for all kinds of interesting things lately, but it annoys me that I can only use it in a content: statement. It’d be amazingly valuable to be able to treat integer-like attribute values as integers and combine it with a calc() in order to facilitate more-dynamic styling of arbitrary sets of HTML elements. Maybe one day…

For the time being, I’m happy enough with my new insertion/deletion markers. If you’d like to see them in use in their natural environment, see the final paragraph of my 2012 review of The Signal and The Noise.

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