Blogging with semantic insertions and deletions

When I write a blog post, it generally becomes a static thing: its content always usually stays the same for the rest of its life (which is, in my case, pretty much forever). But sometimes, I go back and make an amendment. When I make minor changes that don’t affect the overall meaning of the work, like fixing spelling mistakes and repointing broken links, I just edit the page, but for more-significant changes I try to make it clear what’s changed and how.

An insertion and a deletion on a 2007 blog post announcing Troma Night plans.
This blog post from 2007, for example, was amended after its publication with the insertion of content at the top and the deletion of content within.

Historically, I’d usually marked up deletions with the HTML <strike>/<s> elements (or other visually-similar approaches) and insertions by clearly stating that a change had been made (usually accompanied by the date and/or time of the change), but this isn’t a good example of semantic code. It also introduces an ambiguity when it clashes with the times I use <s> for comedic effect in the Web equivalent of the old caret-notation joke:

Be nice to this fool^H^H^H^Hgentleman, he's visiting from corporate HQ.

Better, then, to use the <ins> and <del> elements, which were designed for exactly this purpose and even accept attributes to specify the date/time of the modification and to cite a resource that explains the change, e.g. <ins datetime="2019-05-03T09:00:00+00:00" cite="https://alices-blog.example.com/2019/05/03/speaking.html">The last speaker slot has now been filled; thanks Alice</ins>. I’ve worked to retroactively add such semantic markup to my historical posts where possible, but it’ll be an easier task going forwards.

Of course, no browser I’m aware of supports these attributes, which is a pity because the metadata they hold may well have value to a reader. In order to expose them I’ve added a little bit of CSS that looks a little like this, which makes their details (where available) visible as a sort-of tooltip when hovering over or tapping on an affected area. Give it a go with the edits at the top of this post!

ins[datetime], del[datetime] {
  position: relative;
}

ins[datetime]::before, del[datetime]::before {
  position: absolute;
  top: -24px;
  font-size: 12px;
  color: #fff;
  border-radius: 4px;
  padding: 2px 6px;
  opacity: 0;
  transition: opacity 0.25s;
  hyphens: none;                    /* suppresses sitewide line break hyphenation rules */
  white-space: nowrap;              /* suppresses extraneous line breaks in Chrome      */
}

ins[datetime]:hover::before, del[datetime]:hover::before {
  opacity: 0.75;
}

ins[datetime]::before {
  content: 'inserted ' attr(datetime) ' ' attr(cite);
  background: #050;                 /* insertions are white-on-green                    */
}

del[datetime]::before {
  content: 'deleted ' attr(datetime) ' ' attr(cite);
  background: #500;                 /* deletions are white-on-red                       */
}
CSS facilitating the display of <ins>/<del> datetimes and citations on hover or touch.

I’m aware that the intended use-case of <ins>/<del> is change management, and that the expectation is that the “final” version of a document wouldn’t be expected to show all of the changes that had been made to it. Such a thing could be simulated, I suppose, by appropriately hiding and styling the <ins>/<del> blocks on the client-side, and that’s something I might look into in future, but in practice my edits are typically small and rare enough that nobody would feel inconvenienced by their inclusion/highlighting: after all, nobody’s complained so far and I’ve been doing exactly that, albeit in a non-semantic way, for many years!

I’m also slightly conscious that my approach to the “tooltip” might cause it to obstruct interactivity with something directly above an insertion or deletion: e.g. making a hyperlink inaccessible. I’ve tested with a variety of browsers and devices and it doesn’t seem to happen (my line height works in my favour) but it’s something I’ll need to be mindful of if I change my typographic design significantly in the future.

A final observation: I love the CSS attr() function, and I’ve been using it (and counter()) for all kinds of interesting things lately, but it annoys me that I can only use it in a content: statement. It’d be amazingly valuable to be able to treat integer-like attribute values as integers and combine it with a calc() in order to facilitate more-dynamic styling of arbitrary sets of HTML elements. Maybe one day…

For the time being, I’m happy enough with my new insertion/deletion markers. If you’d like to see them in use in their natural environment, see the final paragraph of my 2012 review of The Signal and The Noise.

Moving Things Around With CSS Transitions

As I indicated in my last blog post, my new blog theme has a “pop up” Dan in the upper-left corner. Assuming that you’re not using Internet Explorer, then when you move your mouse cursor over it, my head will “duck” back behind the bar below it.

My head "pops up" in the top-left hand corner of the site, and hides when you hover your mouse cursor over it.
My head "pops up" in the top-left hand corner of the site, and hides when you hover your mouse cursor over it.

This is all done without any Javascript whatsoever: it’s pure CSS. Here’s how it’s done:

<div class="sixteen columns">
  <div id="dans-creepy-head"></div>
  <h1 id="site-title" class="graphic">
    <a href="https://danq.me/" title="Scatmania">Scatmania</a>
  </h1>
  <span class="site-desc graphic">
    The adventures and thoughts of &quot;Scatman&quot; Dan Q
  </span>
</div>

The HTML for the header itself is pretty simple: there’s a container (the big blue bar) which contains, among other things, a <div> with the id "dans-creepy-head". That’s what we’ll be working with. Here’s the main CSS:

#dans-creepy-head {
  position: absolute;
  top: -24px;
  left: 15px;
  width: 123px;
  height: 133px;
  background: url(/dans-creepy-head.png) top left no-repeat;
  transition: all 800ms;
  -o-transition: all 800ms;
  -webkit-transition: all 800ms;
  -moz-transition: all 800ms;
}
#dans-creepy-head:hover {
  top: 100px;
  height: 60px;
}

The CSS sets a size, position, and background image to the <div>, in what is probably a familiar way. A :hover selector changes the style to increase the distance from the top of the container (from -24px to 100px) and to decrease the height, cropping the image (from 133px to 60px – this was necessary in this case to prevent the bottom of the image from escaping out from underneath the masking bar that it’s supposed to be “hiding behind”). With just that code, you’d have a perfectly workable “duck”, but with a jerky, one-step animation.

The transition directive (and browser-specific prefix versions -o-transition, -webkit-transition, and -moz-transition, for compatability) are what makes the magic happen. This element specifies that any ("all") style is changed on this element (whether via CSS directives, as in this case, or by a change of class or properties by a Javascript function), that a transition effect will be applied to those changes. My use of  "all" is a lazy catch-all – I could have specified the individual properties ( top and  height) that I was interested in changing, and even put different periods on each, but I’ll leave it to you to learn about CSS3 transition options for yourself. The  800ms is the duration of the transition: in my case, 0.8 seconds.

html.ie #dans-creepy-head:hover {
  top: -24px;
  height: 133px;
}
@media (max-width: 780px) {
  #dans-creepy-head {
    display: none;
  }
}

I apply some CSS to prevent the :hover effect from taking place in Internet Explorer, which doesn’t support transitions. The "ie" class is applied to the  <html> tag using Paul Irish’s technique, so it’s easy to detect and handle IE users without loading separate stylesheet files for them. And finally, in order to fit with my newly-responsive design, I make the pop-up head disappear when the window is under 780px wide (at which point there’d be a risk of it colliding with the title).

That’s all there is to it! A few lines of CSS, and you’ve got an animation that degrades gracefully. You could equally-well apply transformations to links (how about making them fade in or out, or change the position of their background image?) or, with a little Javascript, to your tabstrips and drop-down menus.

New Look, New Protocols

Oh yeah: I changed the look-and-feel of scatmania.org the other week, in case you hadn’t noticed. It’s become a sort-of-traditional January activity for me, these years, to redesign the theme of my blog at this point in the year.

This year’s colours are black, white, greys, and red, and you’ll note also that serifed fonts are centre-stage again, appearing pretty-much-universally throughout the site for the first time since 2004. Yes, I know that it’s heavier and darker than previous versions of the site: but it’s been getting fluffier and lighter year on year for ages, now, and I thought it was time to take a turn. You know: like the economy did.

This site as it appeared in 2010. All those bright blues are far too invigorating: time for some nice, sombre, serious colours.

Aside from other cosmetic changes, it’s also now written using several of the new technologies of HTML5 (I may put the shiny new logo on it, at some point). So apologies to those of you running archaic and non-standards-compliant browsers (I’m looking at you, Internet Explorer 6 users) if it doesn’t look quite right, but really: when your browser is more than half as old as the web itself, it’s time to upgrade.

I’ve also got my site running over IPv6 – the next generation Internet protocol – for those of you who care about those sorts of things. If you don’t know why IPv6 is important and “a big thing”, then here’s a simple explanation. Right now you’re probably viewing the IPv4 version: but if you’re using an IPv6-capable Internet connection, you might be viewing the IPv6 version. You’re not missing out, either way: the site looks identical: but this is just my tiny contribution towards building the Internet of tomorrow.

(if you really want to, you can go to ipv6.scatmania.org to see the IPv6 version – but it’ll only work if your Internet Service Provider is on the ball and has set you up with an IPv6 address!)