Creed Cult-ure

My employer, Automattic, has a creed. Right now it reads:

I will never stop learning. I won’t just work on things that are assigned to me. I know there’s no such thing as a status quo. I will build our business sustainably through passionate and loyal customers. I will never pass up an opportunity to help out a colleague, and I’ll remember the days before I knew everything. I am more motivated by impact than money, and I know that Open Source is one of the most powerful ideas of our generation. I will communicate as much as possible, because it’s the oxygen of a distributed company. I am in a marathon, not a sprint, and no matter how far away the goal is, the only way to get there is by putting one foot in front of another every day. Given time, there is no problem that’s insurmountable.

Lots of companies have something like this, even if it falls short of a “creed”. It could be a “vision”, or a set of “values”, or something in that line.

Of course, sometimes that just means they’ve strung three clichéd words together because they think it looks good under their company logo, and they might as well have picked any equally-meaningless words.

Future logo and values of of Any Company, Anywhere.

But while most companies (and their staff) might pay lip service to their beliefs, Automattic’s one of few that seems to actually live it. And not in an awkward, shoehorned-in way: people here actually believe this stuff.

By way of example:

A woman in a wheelchair waves to a colleague via her laptop screen; she's smiling and has a cup of coffee by her side. Photo by Marcus Aurelius from Pexels.
Coffee: check. Webcam: check. Let’s touch bases, random colleague!

We’ve got a bot that, among other things, pairs up people from across the company for virtual “watercooler chat”/”coffee dates”/etc. It’s cool: I pair-up with random colleagues in my division, or the whole company, or fellow queermatticians… and collectively these provide me a half-hour hangout about once a week. It’s a great way to experience the diversity of culture, background and interests of your colleagues, as well as being a useful way to foster idea-sharing and “watercooler effect” serendipity.

For the last six months or so, I’ve been bringing a particular question to almost every random-chat I’ve been paired into:

What part of the Automattic creed resonates most-strongly for you right now?

Two women in black dresses sit in a graveyard by candlelight and hold up the Automattic logo. Edited image based on original photo by Valeria Boltneva from Pexels (used with permission) and the Automattic logo (used under the assumption that they won't mind, given the context).
On a good day, I’m at least 90% certain I’m a senior software engineer and not a cult member.

I volunteer my own answer first. It’s varied over time. Often I’m most-attached to “I will never stop learning.” Other times I connect best to “I will communicate as much as possible…” or “I am in a marathon, not a sprint…”. Lately I’ve felt a particular engagement with “I will never pass up the opportunity to help a colleague…”.

It varies for other people too. But every single person I’ve asked this question has been able to answer it. And they’ve been able to answer it confidently and with justifications for or examples of their choice.

Have you ever worked anywhere before where seemingly all your coworkers profess a genuine belief in the corporate creed? Like, enough that some of them get it tattooed onto their bodies. Unless you’ve been brainwashed by a cult, the answer is probably no.

Dan sits in his office; behind him, four separate monitors show the Automattic logo.
If Automattic is a cult, then it might be too late for me.

Why are Automatticians like that?

For some folks, of course, the creed is descriptive rather than prescriptive. Regarding its initial creation, Matt says that “as a hack to introduce new folks to our culture, we put a beta Automattic Creed, basically a statement of things important to us, written in the first person.”

But this alone isn’t an explanation, because back then there were only around a hundred people in the company: nowadays there are over 1,500. So how can the creed continue to be such a pervasive influence? Or to put it another way: why are Automatticians… like that?

  • Do we simply attract like-minded individuals? The creed is highly visible and cross-referenced by our recruitment pages, so it wouldn’t be entirely surprising.
  • Maybe we filter for people who are ideologically-compatible with the creed? Insofar as the qualities it describes are essential to integrating into our corporate culture, yes: our recruitment process does a great job of testing for those qualities.
  • Perhaps we converge on these values as a result of our experience as Automatticians? Once you’re in, you’re indoctrinated into the tenets of the creed and internalise its ideas.
  • Or perhaps it’s a combination of the three, in some ratio or another. (What’s the ratio?)

I’ve been here 1⅔ years and don’t know the answer yet. But I’ll tell you this: it’s inspiring to be part of a team that really seem to believe in what they do.

The Automattic Creed presented as an infographic with icons accompanying each tenet.
People keep making infographics of the creed, just for fun. Even if they’re not Automatticians (any longer). That’s not creepy, right?

Incidentally: if the creed speaks to you too, you might like to look at some of the many open positions! I promise we’re not actually a cult.

Plus we’ve been doing “work anywhere” for longer than almost anybody else and we’re really, really good at it.

If you enjoyed this, you might also like other blog posts about my time with Automattic: the recruitment process, accepting an offer, my induction, and the experience of lockdown in a distributed company, among others.

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