There is no longer any such thing as Computer Security

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Remember “cybersecurity”? Mysterious hooded computer guys doing mysterious hooded computer guy .. things! Who knows what kind of naughty digital mischief they might be up to? Unfortunately, we now live in a world where this kind of digital mischief is literally rewriting the world’s history. For proof of that, you need look no further than…

A good summary of the worst of the commonplace (non-spear) phishing attacks we’re seeing these days and why 2FA is positively, absolutely what you need (in addition to a password manager) these days.

Five-Eyes Intelligence Services Choose Surveillance Over Security

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The Five Eyes — the intelligence consortium of the rich English-speaking countries (the US, Canada, the UK, Australia, and New Zealand) — have issued a “Statement of Principles on Access to Evidence and Encryption” where they claim their needs for surveillance outweigh everyone’s needs for security and privacy. …the increasing use and sophistication of certain…

How many times must security professionals point out that there’s no such thing as a secure backdoor before governments actually listen? If you make a weakness in cryptography to make it easier for the “good guys” – your spies and law enforcement – then either (a) a foreign or enemy power will find the backdoor too, making everybody less-secure than before, or (b) people will use different cryptographic systems: ones which seem less-likely to have been backdoored.

Solving the information black hole is a challenging and important problem of our time. But backdoors surely aren’t the best solution, right?

What Cyber-War Will Look Like

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When prompted to think about the way hackers will shape the future of great power war, we are wont to imagine grand catastrophes: F-35s grounded by onboard computer failures, Aegis BMD systems failing to launch seconds before Chinese missiles arrive, looks of shock at Space Command as American surveillance satellites start careening towards the Earth–stuff like that. This is the sort of thing that fills the opening chapters of Peter Singer and August Cole’s Ghost Fleet. [1] The catastrophes I always imagine, however, are a bit different than this. The hacking campaigns I envision would be low-key, localized, and fairly low-tech. A cyber-ops campaign does not need to disable key weapon systems to devastate the other side’s war effort. It will be enough to increase the fear and friction enemy leaders face to tip the balance of victory and defeat. Singer and company are not wrong to draw inspiration from technological change; nor are they wrong to attempt to imagine operations with few historical precedents. But that isn’t my style. When asked to ponder the shape of cyber-war, my impulse is to look first at the kind of thing hackers are doing today and ask how these tactics might be applied in a time of war.

Mark Cancian thinks like I do.

In a report Cancian wrote for the Center for Strategic and International Studies on how great powers adapt to tactical and strategic surprise, Cancian sketched out twelve “vignettes” of potential technological or strategic shocks to make his abstract points a bit more concrete. Here is how Cancian imagines an “asymmetric cyber-attack” launched by the PRC against the United States Military:

 The U.S. secretary of defense had wondered this past week when the other shoe would drop.  Finally, it had, though the U.S. military would be unable to respond effectively for a while.

The scope and detail of the attack, not to mention its sheer audacity, had earned the grudging respect of the secretary. Years of worry about a possible Chinese “Assassin’s Mace”-a silver bullet super-weapon capable of disabling key parts of the American military-turned out to be focused on the wrong thing.

The cyber attacks varied. Sailors stationed at the 7th Fleet’ s homeport in Japan awoke one day to find their financial accounts, and those of their dependents, empty. Checking, savings, retirement funds: simply gone. The Marines based on Okinawa were under virtual siege by the populace, whose simmering resentment at their presence had boiled over after a YouTube video posted under the account of a Marine stationed there had gone viral. The video featured a dozen Marines drunkenly gang-raping two teenaged Okinawan girls. The video was vivid, the girls’ cries heart-wrenching the cheers of Marines sickening And all of it fake. The National Security Agency’s initial analysis of the video had uncovered digital fingerprints showing that it was a computer-assisted lie, and could prove that the Marine’s account under which it had been posted was hacked. But the damage had been done.

There was the commanding officer of Edwards Air Force Base whose Internet browser history had been posted on the squadron’s Facebook page. His command turned on him as a pervert; his weak protestations that he had not visited most of the posted links could not counter his admission that he had, in fact, trafficked some of them. Lies mixed with the truth. Soldiers at Fort Sill were at each other’s throats thanks to a series of text messages that allegedly unearthed an adultery ring on base.

The variations elsewhere were endless. Marines suddenly owed hundreds of thousands of dollars on credit lines they had never opened; sailors received death threats on their Twitter feeds; spouses and female service members had private pictures of themselves plastered across the Internet; older service members received notifications about cancerous conditions discovered in their latest physical.

Leadership was not exempt. Under the hashtag # PACOMMUSTGO a dozen women allegedly described harassment by the commander of Pacific command. Editorial writers demanded that, under the administration’s “zero tolerance” policy, he step aside while Congress held hearings.

There was not an American service member or dependent whose life had not been digitally turned upside down. In response, the secretary had declared “an operational pause,” directing units to stand down until things were sorted out.

Then, China had made its move, flooding the South China Sea with its conventional forces, enforcing a sea and air identification zone there, and blockading Taiwan. But the secretary could only respond weakly with a few air patrols and diversions of ships already at sea. Word was coming in through back channels that the Taiwanese government, suddenly stripped of its most ardent defender, was already considering capitulation.[2]

How is that for a cyber-attack?

Dot-dash-diss: The gentleman hacker’s 1903 lulz

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A century ago, one of the world’s first hackers used Morse code insults to disrupt a public demo of Marconi’s wireless telegraph

Nevil Maskelyne – doing it for the lulz?

LATE one June afternoon in 1903 a hush fell across an expectant audience in the Royal Institution’s celebrated lecture theatre in London. Before the crowd, the physicist John Ambrose Fleming was adjusting arcane apparatus as he prepared to demonstrate an emerging technological wonder: a long-range wireless communication system developed by his boss, the Italian radio pioneer Guglielmo Marconi. The aim was to showcase publicly for the first time that Morse code messages could be sent wirelessly over long distances. Around 300 miles away, Marconi was preparing to send a signal to London from a clifftop station in Poldhu, Cornwall, UK.

Yet before the demonstration could begin, the apparatus in the lecture theatre began to tap out a message. At first, it spelled out just one word repeated over and over. Then it changed into a facetious poem accusing Marconi of “diddling the public”. Their demonstration had been hacked – and this was more than 100 years before the mischief playing out on the internet today. Who was the Royal Institution hacker? How did the cheeky messages get there? And why?

An early example of hacking and a great metaphor for what would later become hacker-culture, found in the history of the wireless telegraph.

How Edge Follows In IE’s Security Failings

I’ve generally been pretty defensive of Microsoft Edge, the default web browser in Windows 10. Unlike its much-mocked predecessor Internet Explorer, Edge is fast, clean, modern, and boasts good standards-compliance: all of the things that Internet Explorer infamously failed at! I was genuinely surprised to see Edge fail to gain a significant market share in its first few years: it seemed to me that everyday Windows users installed other browsers (mostly Chrome, which is causing its own problems) specifically because Internet Explorer was so terrible, and that once their default browser was replaced with something moderately-good this would no longer be the case. But that’s not what’s happened. Maybe it’s because Edge’s branding is too-remiscient of its terrible predecessor or maybe just because Windows users have grown culturally-used to the idea that the first thing they should do on a new PC is download a different browser, but whatever the reason, Edge is neglected. And for the most part, I’ve argued, that’s a shame.

Edge's minimalistic Certificate View.
I ranted at an Edge developer I met at a conference, once, about Edge’s weak TLS debugging tools that couldn’t identify an OCSP stapling issue that only affected Edge, but I thought that was the worse of its bugs… until now…

But I’ve changed my tune this week after doing some research that demonstrates that a long-standing security issue of Internet Explorer is alive and well in Edge. This particular issue, billed as a “feature” by Microsoft, is deliberately absent from virtually every other web browser.

About 5 years ago, Steve Gibson observed a special feature of EV (Extended Validation) SSL certificates used on HTTPS websites: that their extra-special “green bar”/company name feature only appears if the root CA (certificate authority) is among the browser’s default trust store for EV certificate signing. That’s a pretty-cool feature! It means that if you’re on a website where you’d expect to see a “green bar”, like Three Rings, PayPal, or HSBC, then if you don’t see the green bar one day it most-likely means that your connection is being intercepted in the kind of way I described earlier this year, and everything you see or send including passwords and credit card numbers could be at risk. This could be malicious software (or nonmalicious software: some antivirus software breaks EV certificates!) or it could be your friendly local network admin’s middlebox (you trust your IT team, right?), but either way: at least you have a chance of noticing, right?

Firefox address bars showing EV certificates of Three Rings CIC (GB), PayPal, Inc. (US), and HSBC Holdings plc (GB)
Firefox, like most browsers, shows the company name in the address bar when valid EV certificates are presented, and hides it when the validity of that certificate is put into question by e.g. network sniffing tools set up by your IT department.

Browsers requiring that the EV certificate be signed by a one of a trusted list of CAs and not allowing that list to be manipulated (short of recompiling the browser from scratch) is a great feature that – were it properly publicised and supported by good user interface design, which it isn’t – would go a long way to protecting web users from unwanted surveillance by network administrators working for their employers, Internet service providers, and governments. Great! Except Internet Explorer went and fucked it up. As Gibson reported, not only does Internet Explorer ignore the rule of not allowing administrators to override the contents of the trusted list but Microsoft even provides a tool to help them do it!

Address bars from major browsers connecting to a spoofed site, with EV certificate "green bars" showing only in Internet Explorer and Edge.
From top to bottom: Internet Explorer 11, Edge 17, Firefox 61, Chrome 68. Only Internet Explorer and Edge show the (illegitimate) certificate for “Barclays PLC”. Sorry, Barclays; I had to spoof somebody.

I decided to replicate Gibson’s experiment to confirm his results with today’s browsers: I was also interested to see whether Edge had resolved this problem in Internet Explorer. My full code and configuration can be found here. As is doubtless clear from the title of this post and the screenshot above, Edge failed the test: it exhibits exactly the same troubling behaviour as Internet Explorer.

Thanks, Microsoft.

Safari doesn't fall for it, either.
I also tried Safari (both on MacOS, above, and iOS, below) and it behaved as the other non-Microsoft browsers do (i.e. arguably more-correctly than IE or Edge).

I shan’t for a moment pretend that our current certification model isn’t without it’s problems – it’s deeply flawed; more on that in a future post – but that doesn’t give anybody an excuse to get away with making it worse. When it became apparent that Internet Explorer was affected by the “feature” described above, we all collectively rolled our eyes because we didn’t expect better of everybody’s least-favourite web browser. But for Edge to inherit this deliberate-fault, despite every other browser (even those that share its certificate store) going in the opposite direction, is just insulting.

Intercepting HTTPS Traffic from Android Emulator

Mostly for my own benefit, as most other guides online are outdated, here’s my set-up for intercepting TLS-encrypted communications from an emulated Android device (in Android Emulator) using Fiddler. This is useful if you want to debug, audit, reverse-engineer, or evaluate the security of an Android app. I’m using Fiddler 5.0 and Android Studio 2.3.3 (but it should work with newer versions too) to intercept connections from an Android 8 (Oreo) device using Windows. You can easily adapt this set-up to work with physical devices too, and it’s not hard to adapt these instructions for other configurations too.

Intercepting a HTTPS connection to DanQ.me on a virtual Android device.

1. Configure Fiddler

Install Fiddler and run it.

Configuring Fiddler

Under Tools > Options > HTTPS, enable “Decrypt HTTPS traffic” and allow a root CA certificate to be created.

Click Actions > Export Root Certificate to Desktop to get a copy of the root CA public key.

Fiddler's Connections settings

On the Connections tab, ensure that “Allow remote computers to connect” is ticked. You’ll need to restart Fiddler after changing this and may be prompted to grant it additional permissions.

If Fiddler changed your system proxy, you can safely change this back (and it’ll simplify your output if you do because you won’t be logging your system’s connections, just the Android device’s ones). Fiddler will complain with a banner that reads “The system proxy was changed. Click to reenable capturing.” but you can ignore it.

2. Configure your Android device

Android Device Manager - New Device

Install Android Studio. Click Tools > Android > AVD Manager to get a list of virtual devices. If you haven’t created one already, create one: it’s now possible to create Android devices with Play Store support (look for the icon, as shown above), which means you can easily intercept traffic from third-party applications without doing APK-downloading hacks: this is great if you plan on working out how a closed-source application works (or what it sends when it “phones home”).

Android emulator showing network settingsIn Android’s Settings > Network & Internet, disable WiFi. Then, under Mobile Network > Access Point Names > {Default access point, probably T-Mobile} set Proxy to the local IP address of your computer and Port to 8888. Now all traffic will go over the virtual cellular data connection which uses the proxy server you’ve configured in Fiddler.

Android network proxy settings

Drag the root CA file you exported to your desktop to your virtual Android device. This will automatically copy the file into the virtual device’s “Downloads” folder (if you’re using a physical device, copy via cable or network). In Settings > Security & Location > Encryption & Credentials > Install from SD Card, use the hamburger menu to get to the Downloads folder and select the file: you may need to set up a PIN lock on the device to do this. Check under Trusted credentials > User to check that it’s there, if you like.

Installing a Root CA in Android.

Test your configuration by visiting a HTTPS website: as you browse on the Android device, you’ll see the (decrypted) traffic appear in Fiddler. This also works with apps other than the web browser, of course, so if you’re reverse-engineering a API-backed application encryption then encryption doesn’t have to impede you.

3. Not working? (certificate pinning)

A small but increasing number of Android apps implement some variation of built-in key pinning, like HPKP but usually implemented in the application’s code (which is fine, because most people auto-update their apps). What this does is ensures that the certificate presented by the server is signed by a certification authority from a trusted list (a trusted list that doesn’t include Fiddler’s CA!). But remember: the app is running on your device, so you’re ultimately in control – FRIDA’s bypass script “fixed” all of the apps I tried, but if it doesn’t then I’ve heard good things about Inspeckage‘s “SSL uncheck” action.

Summary of steps

If you’re using a distinctly different configuration (different OS, physical device, etc.) or this guide has become dated, here’s the fundamentals of what you’re aiming to achieve:

  1. Set up a decrypting proxy server (e.g. Fiddler, Charles, Burp, SSLSplit – note that Wireshark isn’t suitable) and export its root certificate.
  2. Import the root certificate into the certificate store of the device to intercept.
  3. Configure the device to connect via the proxy server.
  4. If using an app that implements certificate pinning, “fix” the app with FRIDA or another tool.

Leak in Comic Chameleon (app API hacking)

I recently discovered a minor security vulnerability in mobile webcomic reading app Comic Chameleon, and I thought that it was interesting (and tame) enough to share as a learning example of (a) how to find security vulnerabilities in an app like this, and (b) more importantly, how to write an app like this without this kind of security vulnerability.

The nature of the vulnerability is that, for webcomics pushed directly into the platform by their authors, it’s possible to read comics (long) before they’re published. By way of proof, here’s a copy of the top-right 200 × 120 pixels of episode 54 of the (excellent) Forward Comic, which Imgur will confirm was uploaded on 2 July 2018: over three months ahead of its planned publication date.

Forward Comic 0054, due for publication in October
I’m not going to spoil this comic for you, but if you follow it then when October comes I think you’ll be pleased.

How to hack a web-backed app

Just to be clear, I didn’t set out to hack this app, but once I stumbled upon the vulnerability I wanted to make sure that I was able to collect enough information that I’d be able to explain to its author what was wrong and how to fix it. You’d be amazed how many systems I find security holes in almost-completely by accident. In fact, I’d just noticed that the application supported some webcomics that I follow but for which I hadn’t been able to find RSS feeds (and so I was selfdogfooding my own tool, RSSey, to “produce” RSS feeds for my reader by screen-scraping: not the most-elegant solution). But if this app could produce a list of issues of the comic, it must have some way of doing what I was trying to do, and I wanted to know what it was.

Comic Chameleon running on Android
Comic Chameleon brings a lot of comics into a single slick Android/iOS app. Some of them you’ll even have heard of!

The app, I figured, must “phone home” to some website – probably the app’s official website itself – to get the list of comics that it supports and details of where to get their feeds from, so I grabbed a copy of the app and started investigating. Because I figured I was probably looking for a URL, the first thing I did was to download the raw APK file (your favourite search engine can tell you how to do this), decompressed it (APK files are just ZIP files, really) and ran strings on it to search for likely-looking URLs:

Running strings on the Comic Chameleon APK contents
As predicted, there are several hard-coded addresses. And all over unencrypted HTTP, eww!

I tried visiting a few of the addresses but many of them seemed to be API endpoints that were expecting additional parameters. Probably, I figured, the strings I’d extracted were prefixes to which those parameters were attached. Rather than fuzz for the right parameters, I decided to watch what the app did: I spun up a simulated Android device using the official emulator (I could have used my own on a wireless network that I control, of course, but this was lazier) and ran my favourite packet sniffer to see what the application was requesting.

Wireshark output showing Comic Chameleon traffic.
The web addresses are even clearer, here, and include all of the parameters I need.

Now I had full web addresses with parameters. Comparing the parameters that appeared when I clicked different comics revealed that each comic in the “full list” was assigned a numeric ID which was used when requesting issues of that comic (along with an intermediate stage where the year of publication is requested).

Comic Chameleon comic list XML
Each comic is assigned an ID number, probably sequentially.

Interestingly, a number of comics were listed with the attribute s="no-show" and did not appear in the app: it looked like comics that weren’t yet being made available via the app were already being indexed and collected by its web component, and for some reason were being exposed via the XML API: presumably the developer had never considered that anybody but their app would look at the XML itself, but the thing about the Web is that if you put it on the Web, anybody can see it.

Still: at this point I assumed that I was about to find what I was looking for – some kind of machine-readable source (an RSS feed or something like one) for a webcomic or two. But when I looked at the XML API for one of those webcomics I discovered quite a bit more than I’d bargained on finding:

no-shows in the episode list produced by the web component of Comic Chameleon
Hey, what’s this? This feed includes titles for webcomics that haven’t been published yet, marked as ‘no-show’…

The first webcomic I looked at included the “official” web addresses and titles of each published comic… but also several not yet published ones. The unpublished ones were marked with s="no-show" to indicate to the app that they weren’t to be shown, but I could now see them. The “official” web addresses didn’t work for me, as I’d expected, but when I tried Comic Chameleon’s versions of the addresses, I found that I could see entire episodes of comics, up to three and a half months ahead of their expected publication date.

Whoops.

Naturally, I compiled all of my findings into an email and contacted the app developer with all of the details they’d need to fix it – in hacker terms, I’m one of the “good guys”! – but I wanted to share this particular example with you because (a) it’s not a very dangerous leak of data (a few webcomics a few weeks early and/or a way to evade a few ads isn’t going to kill anybody) and (b) it’s very illustrative of the kinds of mistakes that app developers are making a lot, these days, and it’s important to understand why so that you’re not among them. On to that in a moment.

Responsible disclosure

Because (I’d like to think) I’m one of the “good guys” in the security world, the first thing I did after the research above was to contact the author of the software. They didn’t seem to have a security.txt file, a disclosure policy, nor a profile on any of the major disclosure management sites, so I sent an email. Were the security issue more-severe, I’d have sent a preliminary email suggesting (and agreeing on a mechanism for) encrypted email, but given the low impact of this particular issue, I just explained the entire issue in the initial email: basically what you’ve read above, plus some tips on fixing the issue and an offer to help out.

"Hacking", apparently
This is what stock photo sites think “hacking” is. Well… this, pages full of green code, or hoodies.

I subscribe to the doctrine of responsible disclosure, which – in the event of more-significant vulnerabilities – means that after first contacting the developer of an insecure system and giving them time to fix it, it’s acceptable (in fact: in significant cases, it’s socially-responsible) to publish the details of the vulnerability. In this case, though, I think the whole experience makes an interesting learning example about ways in which you might begin to “black box” test an app for data leaks like this and – below – how to think about software development in a way that limits the risk of such vulnerabilities appearing in the first place.

The author of this software hasn’t given any answer to any of the emails I’ve sent over the last couple of weeks, so I’m assuming that they just plan to leave this particular leak in place. I reached out and contacted the author of Forward Comic, though, which turns out (coincidentally) to be probably the most-severely affected publication on the platform, so that he had the option of taking action before I published this blog post.

Lessons to learn

When developing an “app” (whether for the web or a desktop or mobile platform) that connects to an Internet service to collect data, here are the important things you really, really ought to do:

  1. Don’t publish any data that you don’t want the user to see.
  2. If the data isn’t for everybody, remember to authenticate the user.
  3. And for heaven’s sake use SSL, it’s not the 1990s any more.
Website message asking visitor to confirm that they're old enough.
It’s a good job that nobody on the Web would ever try to view something easily-available but which they shouldn’t, right? That’s why screens like this have always worked so well.

That first lesson’s the big one of course: if you don’t want something to be on the public Internet, don’t put it on the public Internet! The feeds I found simply shouldn’t have contained the “secret” information that they did, and the unpublished comics shouldn’t have been online at real web addresses. But aside from (or in addition to) not including these unpublished items in the data feeds, what else might our app developer have considered?

  • Encryption. There’s no excuse for not using HTTPS these days. This alone wouldn’t have prevented a deliberate effort to read the secret data, but it would help prevent it from happening accidentally (which is a risk right now), e.g. on a proxy server or while debugging something else on the same network link. It also protects the user from exposing their browsing habits (do you want everybody at that coffee shop to know what weird comics you read?) and from having content ‘injected’ (do you want the person at the next table of the coffee shop to be able to choose what you see when you ask for a comic?
  • Authentication (app). The app could work harder to prove that it’s genuinely the app when it contacts the website. No mechanism for doing this can ever be perfect, because the user hasa access to the app and can theoretically reverse-engineer it to fish the entire authentication strategy out of it, but some approaches are better than others. Sending a password (e.g. over Basic Authentication) is barely better than just using a complex web address, but using a client-side certiciate or an OTP algorithm would (in conjunction with encryption) foil many attackers.
  • Authentication (user). It’s a very-different model to the one currently used by the app, but requiring users to “sign up” to the service would reduce the risks and provide better mechanisms for tracking/blocking misusers, though the relative anonymity of the Internet doesn’t give this much strength and introduces various additional burdens both technical and legal upon the developer.

Fundamentally, of course, there’s nothing that an app developer can do to perfectly protect the data that is published to that app, because the app runs on a device that the user controls! That’s why the first lesson is the most important: if it shouldn’t be on the public Internet (yet), don’t put it on the public Internet.

Hopefully there’s a lesson for you somewhere too: about how to think about app security so that you don’t make a similar mistake, or about some of the ways in which you might test the security of an application (for example, as part of an internal audit), or, if nothing else, that you should go and read Forward, because it’s pretty cool.

Further reading

7 August 2018: I’ve now written a quick explanation about how to intercept HTTPS traffic from Android apps, for those that asked.

Taking Stock, Fraud

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Taking Stock, Fraud Article (Inc.com)
Nowadays, fraudulent online stock-trading schemes are common. But even before the first electric telegraph, two bankers committed the equivalent of modern-day Internet stock fraud.

Nowadays, fraudulent online stock-trading schemes are common. But even before the first electric telegraph, two bankers committed the equivalent of modern-day Internet stock fraud.

Fabulous article from 1999 about how two bankers in 1837 hacked additional data into the fledgling telegraph system to surreptitiously (and illicitly) send messages to give them an edge at the stock exchange. Their innovative approach is similar to modern steganographic systems that hide information in headers, metadata, or within the encoding of invisible characters.

No, Panera Bread Doesn’t Take Security Seriously

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No, Panera Bread Doesn’t Take Security Seriously – PB – Medium by an author (Medium)
tl;dr: In August 2017, I reported a vulnerability to Panera Bread that allowed the full name, home address, email address, food/dietary…

tl;dr: In August 2017, I reported a vulnerability to Panera Bread that allowed the full name, home address, email address, food/dietary preferences, username, phone number, birthday and last four digits of a saved credit card to be accessed in bulk for any user that had ever signed up for an account. This includes my own personal data! Despite an explicit acknowledgement of the issue and a promise to fix it, Panera Bread sat on the vulnerability and, as far as I can tell, did nothing about it for eight months. When Brian Krebs publicly broke the news, other news outlets emphasized the usual “We take your security very seriously, security is a top priority for us” prepared statement from Panera Bread. Worse still, the vulnerability was not fixed at all — which means the company either misrepresented its actual security posture to the media to save face or was not competent enough to determine this fact for themselves. This post establishes a canonical timeline so subsequent reporting doesn’t get confused.

I’m harvesting credit card numbers and passwords from your site. Here’s how.

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I’m harvesting credit card numbers and passwords from your site. Here’s how. (hackernoon.com)
false

It’s been a frantic week of security scares — it seems like every day there’s a new vulnerability. It’s been a real struggle for me personally to pretend like I understand what’s going on when asked about it by family members.

Seeing people close to me get all flustered at the prospect of being “powned” has really put things in perspective for me.

So, it is with a heavy heart that I’ve decided to come clean and tell you all how I’ve been stealing usernames, passwords and credit card numbers from your sites for the past few years.

“I Forgot My PIN”: An Epic Tale of Losing $30,000 in Bitcoin

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In January 2016, I spent $3,000 to buy 7.4 bitcoins. At the time, it seemed an entirely worthwhile thing to do. I had recently started working as a research director at the Institute for the Future’s Blockchain Futures Lab, and I wanted firsthand experience with bitcoin, a cryptocurrency that uses a blockchain to record transactions on its network. I had no way of knowing that this transaction would lead to a white-knuckle scramble to avoid losing a small fortune…

A hacker stole $31M of Ether – how it happened and what it means for Ethereum

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Yesterday, a hacker pulled off the second biggest heist in the history of digital currencies.

Around 12:00 PST, an unknown attacker exploited a critical flaw in the Parity multi-signature wallet on the Ethereum network, draining three massive wallets of over $31,000,000 worth of Ether in a matter of minutes. Given a couple more hours, the hacker could’ve made off with over $180,000,000 from vulnerable wallets.

But someone stopped them…

Hacker figure among code

NISTs new password rules what you need to know

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It’s no secret. We’re really bad at passwords. Nevertheless, they aren’t going away any time soon.

With so many websites and online applications requiring us to create accounts and think up passwords in a hurry, it’s no wonder so many of us struggle to follow the advice of so-called password security experts.

Stereotypical hacker in a hoodie, from the article.

At the same time, the computing power available for password cracking just gets bigger and bigger.

OK, so I started with the bad news, but this cloud does have a silver lining…

Breaking https’ AES-GCM (or a part of it)

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The coolest talk of this year’s Blackhat must have been the one of Sean Devlin and Hanno Böck. The talk summarized this early year’s paper, in a very cool way: Sean walked on stage and announced that he didn’t have his slides. He then said that it didn’t matter because he had a good idea on how to retrieve them…

A hacker 'steals his own slides back'